Showing posts with label "Woodworking Tools You Can Make". Show all posts
Showing posts with label "Woodworking Tools You Can Make". Show all posts

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Treadle Lathe Plans

So I realize there is limited interest in a item such as a treadle lathe in todays environment. My interest lies with Roy Underhill's colonial style reproduction. If you practice your hobby in a small space this is probably not an option, but if space is not a problem, one of these would be a great conversation piece, and if the power goes out, you can always spend your time turning up beautiful shapes, in the shop. No power, not a problem, ha, ha.

The first plan is a nice reproduction of Roy Underhill's lathe by Mike Adams. I found the plan of Mikes lathe on the web many years ago. Mike did a nice job of building Roy's lathe, and wrote and assembled an excellent 19 page pdf manual on the process.

To download the 590 KB pdf click  Treadle Lathe Plans



I found the second plan on the web, also many years ago. Nowhere in this 14 page pdf is the source identified. It is clearly from an older magazine, I suspect it was an older Popular Science plan. It looks like an efficient solid construction and the heavy cast concrete flywheel should do a nice job of storing energy, to even out the power output.

To download the 14 page 389 KB pdf plan click Treadle Lathe.



I have a number of other plans for treadle type lathes. The examples I have posted are a good start, I may revisit this at a later date.

So going to take a little break here, check back end of the week for more blood pumping, excitement inducing, project plans. Insert tongue-in-cheek imoji.

Cheers


Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Scratch Beader

Here is a quick little plan for a scratch beader. Classic colonial furniture likes moldings, There are many different molding shapes available for modern routers and shapers. If you like old tools or like to make them, you may even have a selection of molding planes. When you come across a shape that you can't match, there is always the scratch beader, It is a relatively simple tool to make and if you have access to some tool steel, the scraper blades can be shaped to your requirements. Rude Osolnik touched on this in the Acorn Bed post, for fluting turnings.

A scratch beader is more labor intensive and your moldings will not be as perfect as the product from a router or shaper, but they will be much closer reproductions of the originals.

This article comes from John Nelson's book "Colonial Classics You Can Build Today", published by Stackpole Books in 1986.






Sunday, March 18, 2018

Book Review - Wood's "Woodworking Tools You Can Make"

In 1991 Wood magazine and Meredith Corporation published "Woodworking Tools You Can Make". The book is a collection of projects featured in Wood magazine between 1980 and 1990. If you are familiar with Wood magazine you will know that there are some very nice plans and workshop ideas featured in this magazine. This book is a collection of the best tools and workshop storage ideas featured in the magazine for that decade. Here are the contents and some pictures.







Plans are very complete, taking you through the build process step by step. Material lists and sources are also very complete, and often include kit sources for assemblies that require machined components, such as the headstock and tailstock spindles for the lathe. That was back in the 80's so it is doubtful these sources are still available, but alternatives can be found,  such as replacement parts for conventional machines, or you can always make your own if you have the means.

The book can be found in the used market, where I found this, like new copy. Failing that, all the plans were published in Wood magazine as mentioned above, back in the 80's. I mentioned the lathe to a person on a forum and the issue it was in, a while back. He quickly found the copy (if it was a paper copy, he didn't mention it) on line, so they are out there.

If I am feeling ambitious and my site is still up, I will scan and share the book towards the end of the year.

Cheers