Showing posts with label metalworking plans. Show all posts
Showing posts with label metalworking plans. Show all posts

Sunday, February 10, 2019

Build Your Own Metalworking Lathe From Scrap

So now that you have a furnace, what are you going to do with it? If you are an aspiring machining hobbyist, Dave Gingery's lathe is a very good start. If all you want is a small lathe, the cheap hobby imports might be a better go, but if you want to learn the full gamut of how to produce a accurate piece of shop machinery, building Dave's lathe will fill in much of the learning curve for the novice machinist.

Dave's Shop From Scrap series has been around for almost 40 years now and it still garners interest. I have a full set of all his books in paper, I also have many in my files that I have downloaded over the years. The problem is most are poor quality scans, and I would not repost them without redoing them to a more presentable state. Browsing some of my files recently I found a second copy of "# 2 The Metal Lathe" that was in reasonable shape. A little out of alignment and the picture res. is poor, but very clean and usable. If you haven't found a copy yet, this is one of the cleaner copies around.

To download "Build Your Own Metalworking Lathe From Scrap" go to my Books - Free Downloads  page, # 80 - 1.2 MB - pdf.



Saturday, February 9, 2019

A Small T & C Grinder Part 2

So here are the drawings and material list for this nice small T & C grinder. This would have been quicker done in a pdf. The problem is "Projects In Metal" was published on over sized paper and the two page drawings had to be stitched together from three scans. This would have been a problem for my low end pdf software.

Expand to max. before saving.







Hope someone finds inspiration in this plan. I have the original build manual for the Quorn. The problem is it is 59 MB and would take forever to upload on my disgustingly slow connection. Check out some of my other files below.


I have many other files on tool and cutter grinders, including other Quorn plans. Below is one folder with a selection of many of the files I have collected. See something you like? Message me and I may be able to post it. Not all files include measured plans.

A Small T & C Grinder Part 1

So as promised here is the first part of a very complete plan for a small tool and cutter grinder. Difficulty is in the medium range for the home machinist, (I would class the popular Quorn as advanced). Materials are mostly salvaged material. When I first saw it I recognized the motor right away, I have two of them, purchased many years ago from Princess Auto's surplus offerings.







Ya thats great, but where are the damned drawings? Ha, ha, check out the next post.

Saturday, February 2, 2019

Build Your Own Unimat Style Lathe

Many people are familiar with the small hobby class Unimat style lathe. Before the cheap imports got into the game they were the most affordable small hobby lathe on the market, they were European made by Emco and there were many accessories available including a milling head. The bed and cross slide ways were made of steel shafting and therefor this was a very small lathe to remain ridged.

Here is a plan also built by a European, Guenter Kallies, which is similar to the Unimat, but with larger dimensions. All measurements are metric and there are no castings used. Instructions are relatively clear and include material lists. If you want to avoid the castings in the Gingery plans, this may be an option.

To download the 32 page pdf  click Build Your Own Lathe 3 MB.

The Emco - Unimat Model "SL"





Friday, December 14, 2018

Portable Metal Cutting Bandsaw

Here is a plan for a portable metal cutting bandsaw from the January 1956 Popular Science magazine. This is definitely in the class of advanced hobby machinist. Some would say it's easier now a days to just buy one, but most know that price isn't everything, there is alot of knowledge and enjoyment generated from producing a project like this yourself.

The most difficult is probably the gear reductions, mainly the bevel gear drive box. A easier solution might be to use the bevel drive box from a angle grinder. Some might say "Why not use the whole angle grinder as the power unit?". Speed is not reduced in a angle grinder and the output speed would be to high.

I have always considered one of these, very useful for working with smaller metal shapes. Check out the next post for my solution. A saw like this won't eliminate use of a hacksaw all together, but it comes close.





Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Sensitive Drill Press

So to make up for the other drill press plan, I did't upload, here is an excellent and easy (compared to most other plans out there) plan for a sensitive drill press. This plan comes from the "Metal Projects Book 3" by John R. Walker, mentioned previously.

Construction materials are mostly thick aluminum plate and cold rolled steel. If you can't find a couple of small 1 1/4" aluminum plates for the drill head and table support, you can cast then if you have a furnace and it will be good practice in setting cores. I have lots of small drill presses, so my preference would be for the option on page 4, I have lots of Dremel type tools and this would be perfect over the flimsy mounts they usually come with. Maybe after New Years if I feel energetic.

Check this out, enjoy.





How To Make A Slip Roll Machine # 3

So here is the last of the Intermediate Technology Publications "Workshop Equipment" series. I have one more # 2 "How To Make A Treadle Operated Drill Press" . However the scan is of very poor quality (half pages cut off) and in my opinion it is an inferior design. I also did not upload #'s 8 and 9, I have searched, but been unable to find them.

So here is # 3 "How To Make A Slip Roll Machine". There are many plans around for this type of machine, I have posted plans for 2 or 3 other versions and I have a few more I will post in the future. This one is typical of the other plans in this series most of the materials are standard steel stock and a welder is necessary.

To download "How To Make A Slip Roll Machine # 3" go to my Books - Free Downloads page, # 76 - 2.5 MB - pdf.


Saturday, December 8, 2018

Old Becomes New Again

There are many who pass off the old PM plans as being obsolete, but for being obsolete, it is surprising how often they show up again as new ideas or as new versions of an old idea. In many cases you are not aware of the previous versions in the old PM or PS magazines. I have been victim to this a few times and it's both, a boost, and a let down, that someone else thought of the idea first.

Following is an example of this conundrum. Back in the late thirties PM published a plan for a useful horizontal disc sander, it's easy to see how this could be very useful, especially for sharpening edge tools, with a few jigs to control the angles.

Below is the plan for the disc sander along with a plan for a beast of a belt sander. I got this from a Popular Mechanics Press book titled "Forty Power Tools You Can Make". It was published in 1941 and the plans are all taken from previous PM magazines. I have posted most of the plans before, in the Shop Notes posts.



Dave Gingery does a recreation of this disc sander in his first book in the "Metal Working Shop From Scrap" series, "The Charcoal Foundry". Dave recognized the versatility of this disc sander for pattern making and tool sharpening and built one almost exactly the same as the old plan in PM. This may have been a product of Dave's very creative mind, but as I like to say "Their's nothing new under the sun" old becomes new again, just a little different.

Don't forget to read Dave's nice little write up on the disc sander and it's uses.



Tuesday, November 20, 2018

How To Make A Treadle-Operated Wood-Turning Lathe # 6

So continuing with ITP's Workshop Equipment series, here is # 6 "How To Make A Treadle-operated Wood-turning Lathe". This is a metalworking project and involves welding but it's used for woodworking (that will piss-off a few, ha, ha).

This lathe is welded up from mild steel sections and incorporates salvaged parts for the flywheel and drive assembly, mainly a brake drum and bicycle drive parts. There are woodturners who prefer to use a treadle lathe even in the presence of power, it's a personal preference. Mainly, treadle lathes are machines from the past when electrical power was something that shot out of the sky in lightning bolts. If your off grid, like to save on your energy bill, or just enjoy the slower control of a treadle lathe this is one of the more advanced versions of the treadle lathe out there.

To download "How To Make A Treadle-operated Wood-turning Lathe" go to my Books - Free Downloads page. # 67 - 3 MB - pdf.


Looking for a good read? If you like reading politics, and how it is failing us, you might like this.

Interested in reading a good book on the state of the union by a prize winning author? "America, The Farewell Tour" by Christopher Hedges is a good place to start. It has become clear to most that America is on the backside of the slope. The question is how fast and steep will the ride down the slope get? Mr. Hedges is certain we will find that out within the next 20 years (damn, I might live to see it, ha, ha). The author puts the blame squarely on the heads of big business and the 1%. They have destroyed the economic well being of 95% of us, and they are destroying our planet at a unprecedented rate, to satisfy their insatiable appetite, for the power of ultimate wealth. It's a given the Republicans are their puppets and the Democrats have been bought off long time ago. Bernie Sanders was a bright light in the last American election but the Democratic party and their controllers the 1% weren't going to let that happen. The result, Trump. The masses figured he couldn't hurt them worst than Clinton and the Democratic Party had already done (letting the 1% destroy the working class in America to maximize their profits). So what about the 1%, no problem they had both bases covered. God help us, oops, the Republicans own him, were in trouble. 

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

How To Make A Metal-Bending Machine # 10

So from Intermediate Technology Publications comes another of their Workshop Equipment titles. This one "How To Make A Metal-Bending Machine # 10" is the last of the paper copies I have. Like the other two, it cleaned up nice and is complete.

The first half of the manual shows you how to build the bender. The second half of the manual shows you how to build a steel wheel for a agricultural cart. Now your probably thinking "What is wrong with this "Bozo"? What am I going to do with an ox cart?" ha, ha, lol .

But of course you can bend up countless other shapes, for many different projects, with this bender.

To download this manual go to my Books - Free Downloads page. # 66 - 3 MB - pdf 




Saturday, November 10, 2018

An Easy Guillotine Tool

Guillotine tools are very useful helpers for the smith who works alone. A good one will cut your time in shaping and cut-off operations depending on your selection of dies. Dies are easy to make, so it's a simple matter to have a good selection on hand to suit the type of work you are doing.

I have seen many ideas for making guillotines around the web over the years, some are more complicated to make than others. Many have probably seen the one I am posting today before, it has made it's rounds on the web. It is one of the easiest I have seen to build, a few workshop scraps and some welding is all you need. A small price for the huge help this tool can be.

The plan was originally published in ABANA's "Hammer's Blow" newsletter. I got this copy from the "Saltfork Craftsman" newsletter of August 2005.







Atmospheric Forge & Heat Treat Oven

So I spent yesterday morning running errands and settling in for winter. I was almost home when the blizzard started, It blew hard all night and is supposed to continue all day today. Nothing else to do but cook up some tasty treats (winter's coming on, like the bears, a little insulation will help, lol) , fire up the wood stove, and settle in in front of the computer, for the week end. Life is good ha, ha.


Near the top of my build list is a forge, soon I hope. I have lots of plans for forges, and some ideas of my own. One plan that I have always found attractive was published by David J. Gingery Publishing back in the 90's. It was built and the manual written up by William T. Goodman and Robert W. Holmee. It has a very nice appearance but I would make some changes to the shape and refractory of the firing chamber. The refractory in the plan is a little thin in my opinion and there are more efficient materials that can be used today.

It took me a while to find this book, I think I eventually found it on a torrent site. The scan is not great (I cleaned up the two pages below), but it is complete. So if you would like a proven plan for a nice and very convenient forge or just want some good ideas for building one, this should do it.

To download go to my Books - Free Downloads page. # 65 - 4 MB - pdf




Wednesday, November 7, 2018

How To Make A Hand-Operated Holepunch

So as mentioned before I will be uploading a few more "Workshop Equipment" series titles, published by Intermediate Technology Publications.

Today you can download "# 7 How To Make A Hand-Operated Holepunch". As I mentioned before I have taken a bit of time to assemble this file, and you will not find a cleaner version of this title on the internet.

I would consider this project one of the more advanced in the 10 volume series. If you have not done a lot of metalworking before, it is important to go slow and verify your work continually before welding up your assemblies. The finished hole punch will be a great time saver for anyone who requires a lot of holes in sheet metal. It will punch holes up to 25mm or 31/32" in 16 guage  material.

Probably the hardest part of the project will be, making up accurate punch dies. Above 9/32 to 31/32, lacking a suitable supplier, you will have to make your own. Instructions are in the manual.

For holes 9/32 or smaller a cheap alternative is to adapt the punch dies from a hand hole punch, done easily enough.This inexpensive set cost only $34, 10 years ago. It works, but it is a slow process. Installing the dies in your new holepunch would greatly speed things up.


So If you would like to download this nice plan manual, go to my Books - Free Downloads page. # 64 - 4.4 MB - pdf.


Saturday, November 3, 2018

Half Scale Stutz Bearcat Sidewalker

So from the "Junior Mechanics Handbook" is the plan for a half scale, Stutz Bearcat, sidewalker, that I mentioned in a previous post. This is a challenging and interesting project for the all around workshop diy'er. It incorporates aspects of both woodworking and metalworking. If your looking to really impress some young folk with an awesome project, this one will certainly do it.

At 11 pages the project plan is quite complete, and leaves little to the imagination. I have learned over time to clean up and stitch pages together, as long as I can fit the page flat to the scanner glass. Over-size books that lift at the scanner edges, produce deep shadow and are harder to clean up, without effecting the scan content. Stitching pages together allows me to upload more pages in a smaller space. Resolution is good if you expand images to there max., I have no trouble clearly reading the images without my glasses, and believe me, I need my glasses for most of the reading I do nowadays. My pixel height is normally 1200 with the width, a ratio of the original.