Showing posts with label woodwork machines. Show all posts
Showing posts with label woodwork machines. Show all posts

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Setting Jointer Knives

So for the second tune-up article, also from March/April 1996 "Woodworkers Journal", an article on setting a new set of jointer knives. Setting a new set of knives can be time consuming, frustrating and dangerous as in this post http://www.hobbyworkshopprojects.com/2018/10/3-phase-is-it-worth-converting.html, without a good plan of action.

This article has a nice plan for a jig to help with accurate, consistent, knife setting and take some of the frustration out of the procedure.





Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Tablesaw Tune-Up

So we are forecast to get 15 to 25 cm. of snow between tonight and tomorrow night, so I figured I'd get a couple of posts in tonight.

Going through some old magazines I came across a couple of articles on shop machine tune-ups to match the previous article on band saw tune-up. These two articles are both in the March/April 1996 issue of "Woodworkers Journal".

The first article is on tablesaw tune-up, more specifically the Delta contractor style tablesaw. Sears puts out similar tablesaws and all of the importers sell a version of this saw, Busy Bee, Grizzly, and others.








Sunday, January 27, 2019

12" Thickness Sander

Planers and drum sanders are expensive, if the work you do does not justify such an expense, a homebuilt drum sander might be the answer. There are lots of plans around the web for drum sanders, some are very advanced with powered feed beds and planer type thickness adjustments, most are much simpler but often need some finesse for a better look.

"WOOD" magazine published a plan back in the 80's that fits both of these characteristics. It is relatively simple to construct and looks great. It will handle a 12" width but this can be easily increased. For purchases you will need a motor, two pillow block bearings, a shaft, and a switch. Yes, thats it, except for the wood and fasteners of course, The listed sources may still be available.

Say "Thank you WOOD magazine" and enjoy.








Monday, December 10, 2018

A Few Short Articles

Back in the 80's Fine Woodworking published a series of manuals titled "Fine Woodworking On". The series had titles like "Making And Modifying Machines" and "Woodworking Machines" they were all composed from articles in the first 10 years (1975-1985) of Fine Woodworking magazine. I will visit these again, at a later time.

Here are a couple of short articles and the cover picture of "Making And Modifying Machines". Remember this post "Scroll Saw On Steroids", Here is a picture from the cover that was not in the posted article. It is pretty clear from this picture, that I wasn't kidding when I said "on steroids". Check out the size of timber the author is cutting here, you would need a large, tough, band saw to handle a cut like this, and the length would be limited by the throat depth. With this beast and outboard supports, you could cut to shape the center of a 16'er if you so desired.


This article was originally published in the May 1980 FW magazine. It is a tongue-in-cheek look at tool steel production. The technical details are correct the scenario is hilarious, as is the illustration, LOL.


It seems D. Gingery thought the illustration was entertaining as well, and included it in the first page, of the second edition of, "The Charcoal Foundry".


The second article today comes from the March 1980 FW magazine. This article covers a very inexpensive alternative to a jointer. You can't do the face with this, but for perfect edge surfaces, this can be faster with a better finish than a jointer. I have seen this idea a few times before, the Shopsmith Mark V combination machine has sold a disc accessory like this, for it's machines, since back in the 1950's. It is certainly safer than just cutting square with the table saw or even using the jointer.

Edit: So I don't know where my head was when I called the Shopsmith Mark V a Woodsmith yesterday, so when I noticed that today I had to correct it. While I was at it I decided to post a page from the Shopsmith 2005 accessory catalog, where they sell this disc for their machines.


At $50 it is a heck of alot cheaper than buying a jointer. Even better, it's free if you have a small furnace to cast the disc in aluminum. You can finish it on a wood turning lathe if you do not have a metalworking lathe.

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Old Becomes New Again

There are many who pass off the old PM plans as being obsolete, but for being obsolete, it is surprising how often they show up again as new ideas or as new versions of an old idea. In many cases you are not aware of the previous versions in the old PM or PS magazines. I have been victim to this a few times and it's both, a boost, and a let down, that someone else thought of the idea first.

Following is an example of this conundrum. Back in the late thirties PM published a plan for a useful horizontal disc sander, it's easy to see how this could be very useful, especially for sharpening edge tools, with a few jigs to control the angles.

Below is the plan for the disc sander along with a plan for a beast of a belt sander. I got this from a Popular Mechanics Press book titled "Forty Power Tools You Can Make". It was published in 1941 and the plans are all taken from previous PM magazines. I have posted most of the plans before, in the Shop Notes posts.



Dave Gingery does a recreation of this disc sander in his first book in the "Metal Working Shop From Scrap" series, "The Charcoal Foundry". Dave recognized the versatility of this disc sander for pattern making and tool sharpening and built one almost exactly the same as the old plan in PM. This may have been a product of Dave's very creative mind, but as I like to say "Their's nothing new under the sun" old becomes new again, just a little different.

Don't forget to read Dave's nice little write up on the disc sander and it's uses.



Sunday, December 2, 2018

"Getting The Most Out Of Your Circular Saw And Jointer"

Over the years Delta published many"Getting The Most Out Of Your ....." manuals covering most of the shop equipment found in a typical workshop. I posted one a while back on abrasive equipment, grinders, sanders, etc. This edition comes from 1937 and covers table saws and jointers. They are not large, this one is 52 pages, but they are packed with info. cover to cover. I have a few more titles and editions, hopefully get them up in the future.

To download "Getting The Most Out Of Your Circular Saw And Jointer", go to my Books - Free Downloads page, # 73 - 5 MB - pdf.



Get'n so thick out there, I can't see out the windows ha,ha. Oh well back to the football game, no sign of a single snow flake there ha, ha.

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Treadle Lathe Plans

So I realize there is limited interest in a item such as a treadle lathe in todays environment. My interest lies with Roy Underhill's colonial style reproduction. If you practice your hobby in a small space this is probably not an option, but if space is not a problem, one of these would be a great conversation piece, and if the power goes out, you can always spend your time turning up beautiful shapes, in the shop. No power, not a problem, ha, ha.

The first plan is a nice reproduction of Roy Underhill's lathe by Mike Adams. I found the plan of Mikes lathe on the web many years ago. Mike did a nice job of building Roy's lathe, and wrote and assembled an excellent 19 page pdf manual on the process.

To download the 590 KB pdf click  Treadle Lathe Plans



I found the second plan on the web, also many years ago. Nowhere in this 14 page pdf is the source identified. It is clearly from an older magazine, I suspect it was an older Popular Science plan. It looks like an efficient solid construction and the heavy cast concrete flywheel should do a nice job of storing energy, to even out the power output.

To download the 14 page 389 KB pdf plan click Treadle Lathe.



I have a number of other plans for treadle type lathes. The examples I have posted are a good start, I may revisit this at a later date.

So going to take a little break here, check back end of the week for more blood pumping, excitement inducing, project plans. Insert tongue-in-cheek imoji.

Cheers


Saturday, November 3, 2018

"WOOD's" 1986 Multi-Machine

In WOOD's 1986, issue # 9 magazine, a very useful grinding and sanding machine was featured. At 8 speeds it allowed for slow enough speeds to do wet grinding, for putting very sharp edges on your cutting tools, without overheating. It also included a 8" sanding disk and the ability to run sanding drums and pneumatic spindle sanders. I built a similar sander without the speed changes and featuring two 8" sanding discs. I have taken it apart since I purchases my three 12" sanders, but I still have the shaft and bearings. Still waiting for me to find a new use for it, lol.

This would be a very convenient machine for a small shop, with it's ability to handle a variety of operations, weather your a woodworker, metalworker or other small shop hobbyist.






So the "Workshop Equipment" series plan that I posted a couple of posts ago, seems to have garnered lots of interest. In the next few weeks look for me to post the other two paper copies, I have. I will consider repackaging the other 6 poorly scanned downloads, that I have. I can't do anything about the first 2 or 3 missing pages, but they don't effect the actual build instructions.


Sunday, October 14, 2018

Scroll Saw On Steroids

It's called a Walking-Beam saw, and if you don't like the cost of a large throat band saw or would rather avoid the more involved task of building one, this is a easier alternative. You can cross cut a infinitely long panel 32" wide on this saw, or rip a panel twice that width down the middle. Try to do that on your band saw. You can even do inside cuts, work your band saw can't do unless you have a blade welder.

It's called the poor mans band saw, probably because it's cheaper and so much easier to build. For blades you can use a band saw blade of a size according to your needs, cut it up into 20" lengths and punch pin holes in the ends, you may have to heat the ends to avoid cracks in the punching process, inexpensive and easy.

It has been said that all the machines a wood turner (spindle or bowl) needs in addition to the lathe is a band saw and drill press. This walking-beam is a perfect and easier alternative to the band saw. It will rough out huge chunks of wood for the bowl turner and do the diagonal center cuts for centering spindle work.

It's not high on my list but I would love to build one of these for my ventilated shop space. It would handle rough construction type work, and do the work of a slew of saws like the band saw, table saw, miter saw, radial arm, and yes, even work that is to large for the regular scroll saw.

The build and plan are by Mark White, back in 1980 he was a teacher of house construction and boat-building at Alaska Community College. This article was published in Fine Woodworking # 24 - 1980.





Does the frame design look familiar to you? Yes, it does to me too. Back in 1943 Popular Mechanics published a plan for a foot powered scroll saw in their Shop Notes, that had a similar frame design. If you would like to check this out, here is the link to that post. 



Thursday, October 11, 2018

Portable To Table Saw And My Table Saw

Excluding "Popular Mechanics" and "Popular Science", "Workbench" has been around the longest of the modern DIY magazines. Started in 1958 it concentrates on whole house articles from renovations to yard projects and back inside to the workshop.

The article I selected from the first issue is a project that has seen many versions over the years. For the beginner with limited funds who has a circular portable saw and would like a table saw, this solution is a decent alternative, until you can purchase a dedicated table saw or build a more advanced saw of your own.

When it comes to a table saw, lots of iron, with a accurately machined, large, table surface, is the way to go. But that is just me. With the advent of the web many people have advanced and built wood framed fully adjustable table saws. If you want more than just the basic conversion in this article, you might want to check out Mathias Wandel's site at Woodgears.ca or John Heisz's site at Ibuildit.ca., he is currently building a nice fully adjustable wood framed saw. If you look back in my Popular Mechanics plans posts, there are a few wood table saw versions there also.

So from Workbench #1-1958, here is the article "A Table Saw From Your Portable".





So here is a picture of my table saw. A very long time ago (ha, ha) I started out like many with a similar plan to the Workbench plan above. The table I built was smaller but basically the same. I built alot of decent projects with that make-do table saw. In 83 I purchased a Taiwan import from Busy Bee. It was a knock-off of a low end contractor saw and underpowered. You know the type, with the open web, iron, extension tables. I sold it when I sold the workshop in the Ottawa area, mentioned in another post.

So In 2001 I was building my house and shop on my little piece of heaven up here. I made a trip to Toronto, and on my way home stopped at the Canadian Tire in Barrie on a whim. Sure enough they had Delta's top of the line contractor saw on sale reg. $700 for $625. There was a hole in the fence and rail box, on further inspection I found the back rail was missing. I offered $550, after hemming and hawing and a consultation with the manager they agreed. I brought it home and within 3 days the Delta dealer had shipped me a new back rail, free of charge, can't beat service like that.

Love this saw, big, heavy, accurate table, lots of blade head adjustment, the 1 1/2 HP sealed Delta motor has lots of power. I have never stalled or tripped the overload on it. The huge extruded aluminum front rail and fence have adjustment and T slots for accessories.

I don't ever see a need for another saw, however if a used Uni-Saw or even a General, presented itself at the right price, I probably would grab it, if only to rebuild it to it's former glory.



For dust control I built a hopper and attached it to the bottom saw frame. The hopper is built from 1/4" plywood with triangular strips to strengthen the corners. A 4" dust collection gate was installed at the bottom to accept 4" dust collector hose.


For a better seal I cut a foam cover to fit the back and attached it with double sided tape for vertical cuts. For tilted cuts the foam is easily removed. Under the foam is a 1/4" plywood back cover that is shaped to allow a full 45* tilt. It opens up the back a bit but dust collection is still decent.


In the pictures, the blade guard is removed. Don't run a table saw without a blade guard in place.